Resource Type: Resource

Pathways to health through Australian woodlands and forests: Sign-posts from recent research and practice

Health is inherently ‘ecological’ and the natural environment plays a crucial role in human health and well-being. Yet we do not necessarily design, manage or market such areas in ways that acknowledge this link. This paper draws on recent research by a Deakin University team exploring the links between use of and involvement in the …

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Green Infrastructure Life support for human habitats

Ely, M. and Pitman, S., 2014. Green Infrastructure Life Support For human habitats. The compelling evidence for incorporating nature into urban environments. Botanic Gardens of South Australia, Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources. 380 p.    

The relationship between nature connectedness and happiness: A meta-analysis

Capaldi, C.A., Dopko, R.L. and Zelenski, J.M., 2014. The relationship between nature connectedness and happiness: A meta-analysis. Frontiers in psychology, p.976.   Research suggests that contact with nature can be beneficial, for example leading to improvements in mood, cognition, and health. A distinct but related idea is the personality construct of subjective nature connectedness, a stable …

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Green infrastructure, ecosystem services, and human health

Contemporary ecological models of health prominently feature the natural environment as fundamental to the ecosystem services that support human life, health, and well-being. The natural environment encompasses and permeates all other spheres of influence on health. Reviews of the natural environment and health literature have tended, at times intentionally, to focus on a limited subset …

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Association of urban green space with mental health and general health among adults in Australia

Astell-Burt, T. and Feng, X., 2019. Association of urban green space with mental health and general health among adults in Australia. JAMA network open, 2(7), pp.e198209-e198209.   IMPORTANCE Recent studies indicate that living near more green space may support mental and general health and may also prevent depression. However, most studies are cross-sectional, and few have considered …

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The wellbeing benefits associated with perceived and measured biodiversity in Australian urban green spaces

There are few studies examining the wellbeing benefits from exposure to natural environments differing in ecological attributes, such as biodiversity, and they have not had consistent results. This study progresses our understanding of the nuanced relationship between nature and wellbeing by analyzing the self-reported benefits derived from urban green spaces varying in a range of …

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Community Engagement Toolkit: Urban Forest Governance – Australia and New Zealand

This toolkit has been created to share knowledge through capturing and disseminating attitudes and experiences of leading urban forest managers in Australia and New Zealand. You can read the executive summary below and/or contact me if you would like to read the whole document. Urban forest governance relies on co-operation between state and non-state actors …

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More green, less lonely? A longitudinal cohort study

Citation Astell-Burt, T., Hartig, T., Eckermann, S., Nieuwenhuijsen, M., McMunn, A., Frumkin, H. and Feng, X., 2022. More green, less lonely? A longitudinal cohort study. International journal of epidemiology, 51(1), pp.99-110. Abstract Background Urban greening may reduce loneliness by offering opportunities for solace, social reconnection and supporting processes such as stress relief. We (i) assessed associations between …

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